Hemingray Embossing Styles  

Over the decades, Hemingray used many different styles for embossing their insulators. Here we will detail the main embossing styles that were used over the years, with picture examples.

PLEASE NOTE: These dates are only approximate, and will likely change as I learn more!

December Patent Style (c.1871 - c.1887)
Early Script Style (c.1887 - c.1894)
Transition Style (c.1893 - c.1895)
New Script Style (c.1895 - c.1898)
Prismatic Style (c.1895 - c.1901)
Large Stamped, Old Style (c.1902 - c.1919)
Large Stamped, New Style (c.1920s - 1939)
Large Stamped, Narrow Style
Large Stamped, Alternate "G"
Large Stamped, Alternate "3" (c.1938 - c.1946)
Medium Stamped Style (c.1938 - c.1946)
Serif Script (1941)
Small Stamped Style (c.1942 - 1960s)
Extra Small Stamped Style (1951 - 1956)

December Patent Style (c.1871 - c.1887)

This is the first style of embossing that was used on most of Hemingray's earliest insulators (bearing the December 19, 1871 patent date.) As each mold was hand engraved, these were not embossed with complete consistency. These were embossed on either the front crown (one or two lines), or the front skirt (always two lines).

Known CDs with this embossing style: 116, 120, 121.4, 124, 124.1, 124.2, 124.3, 124.5, 125, 126.3, 126.4, 127.4, 130.2, 131.4, 132, 132.4, 133, 133.1, 133.4, 134, 317, 317.5, 732.2

 

Early Script Style (c.1887 - c.1894)

The earliest insulators embossed with H.G.CO. are in larger, hand-engraved letters. Insulator styles produced by Hemingray for other companies during this time period, such as S.B.T.&T.Co., also have this embossing style.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 112, 133, 145, 151, 160, 162, 164, 185.2, 201, 204, 287.1, 287.2, 1073, 1085

 

Transition Style (c.1893 - c.1895)

Hemingray added the May 2, 1893 patent date embossing to several molds which were originally smooth base. Note the larger "H.G.CO." with the smaller patent date squeezed in underneath it.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 133?, 151?, 160, 162, 164

 

New Script Style (c.1895 - c.1898)

Also referred to as "Evo Script". Around this time, new insulators styles such as the No.9 and No.11 were introduced, and these were embossed with "Hemingray" instead of "H.G.CO." (although new molds for other existing styles were still being embossed with "H.G.CO."; this would last well into the early 1900s and the stamped era). They were still hand-engraved at this point.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 106, 112.4, 113, 114, 134, 160, 162, 164, 185, 196, 196.2, 257

 

Prismatic Style (c.1895 - c.1901)

Also known as Prism or Prismic, this embossing style has a sharp, chiseled look to it. The number "2" usually has a distinctive looped "2", although a wedge "2" also exists.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 106, 113, 116, 121, 124, 133, 134, 145, 160, 162, 164, 178, 190/191, 196, 201, 280, 281, 282?


Large Stamped, Old Style (c.1902 - c.1919)

This is the first of Hemingray's stamped style embossings. Unlike the previous hand-engraved embossings, these were embossed with stamped letters. The main distinguishing feature of the Large Stamped Old Style is the serifs on the "1". This is the last embossing style where the "H.G.CO." embossing appears; after this, "Hemingray" became the standard and "H.G.CO." was phased out completely.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 102, 106, 113, 115, 121, 122, 124, 125, 133, 134, 145, 147, 150, 151, 152, 152.2, 154, 157, 160, 162, 164, 169, 185, 190/191, 196, 196.5, 201, 202, 205, 208, 213, 251, 252, 254, 257, 263, 280, 281, 291, 295, 304/310, 1070


Large Stamped, New Style (c.1920s - 1939)

This stamped style is very similar to the Old Style, but note that the "1" does not have any serifs.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 106, 113, 115, 122, 125, 128, 134, 142, 142.4, 145, 154, 155, 160, 162, 164, 168, 175, 183, 186, 186.1, 186.2, 190/191, 197, 202, 205, 208, 214, 219, 220, 221, 230, 233, 237, 238, 238.1, 241, 241.2, 242, 243, 251, 252, 254, 257, 271, 281, 295, 301.5, 1052, 1070, 1087, 1104


Large Stamped, Narrow Style

A couple of styles were produced with stamped letters that are significantly narrower than normal. All of the ones that I've seen have longer, sharp drip points and are Hemingray Blue in color.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 122, 154

 

Large Stamped, Alternate "G"

Some of the large stamped molds have an alternate "G". Instead of a traditional "G" with a crossbar, it appears to be more of a "C" with a tail on it (see example below).

Known CDs with this embossing style: 106, 115, 122, 134, 145, 154, 162, 214

 

Large Stamped, Alternate "3" (c.1938 - c.1946)

Some large stamped embossings have an alternate "3". Unlike the standard "3" with a rounded top, the alternate "3" has a flat top like a "7" (see example below).

Known CDs with this embossing style: 128, 128.4, 197

 

Medium Stamped Style (c.1938 - c.1946)

This stamped style is slightly smaller than the large style shown above.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 115, 122, 155, 197, 233.2, 251

 

Serif Script (1941)

For some unknown reason Hemingray reverted back to hand-engraved embossings for some molds created in 1941. Some of these have slight flares at the ends of the letterforms which resemble serifs.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 113, 115, 155, 165, 216, 230


Small Stamped Style (c.1942 - 1960s)

This is the last of the stamped styles. With the exception of the purple CD 194/195, all Hemingray styles with this type of embossing are found in clear or near-clear colors such as straw.

Known CDs with this embossing style: 106, 107, 113, 115, 122, 129, 154, 155, 160, 163, 165, 167, 194/195, 203, 214, 218, 219, 220, 230, 231, 231.2, 238, 238.6, 239, 239.2, 1032, 1049, 1052, 1053, 1071

 

Extra Small Stamped Style (1951 - 1956)

This extra small stamped style only appears on a few of the Hemingray/Kimble embossed power pieces, where the smaller letters are used for "TEMPERED".

Known CDs with this embossing style: 231, 231.2, 239


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